Granite & Granite Slabs

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Granite Slabs

Granite slabs for granite countertops are imported mostly from South America and China. The slabs are cut at the quarry into pieces that are about ten feet long, six feet wide and two inches thick. They are then imported by granite wholesalers and sold to granite countertop fabricators and installers. Thousands of slabs in hundreds of colors are imported weekly so if you know where to look, you can get superb granite slabs for a competitive price. Hundreds of colors and styles of granite slabs are available for you to select from so you can get the exact color granite countertop you want for your home.

You will not see these slabs or even pictures of them at Lowes or Home Depot, but you can see them on the internet and if you are close to a wholesaler, you can go with your installer to select the slab you want. If you are too far away, the internet is the next best thing. If you are in the Atlanta or North Georgia area we recommend Slabco Marble & Granite 706-213-1255 for granite slabs.
 

Stones other than Granite

MARBLE
Marble has been valued for thousands of years for its rich palette of colors.   Marble is however more porous than granite. For this reason, we highly recommend that you NOT put marble in the kitchen.  Marble stones consist of limestone that has undergone heat and pressure. A transformation process takes place when the weight of overlying material, pressure from crystal collisions and heat from the earth's core generate temperatures in excess of 1800F. Texture of marble depends on the form, size and uniformity of grains. The element components of marble determine the color of the stone. Generally calcite and dolomite marbles are of pure white color. Variations of whiteness of pure marbles are due to the mixture of foreign substances. Such impurities form streaks and clouds. White Cabrera, Emperador Dark, Alabama White, Crema Valencia. Click here to see our marble gallery.

TRAVERTINE
Travertine is generally used for floors, walls, countertops and for outside as cladding and pavement. Travertine is generally filled with grout before it is honed or polished, which produces a uniform surface more like other stones. Unfilled travertine is also quite beautiful, and is often seen as exterior surfaces of buildings. Travertine stones result from hot spring water penetrating up through underground limestone. When the water evaporates, it leaves behind layers of dissolved limestone and other minerals, giving it its banded appearance. Travertine stones are generally light-colored beiges and tans. Colors include Nocce Vein Crosscut, and Classico Crosscut. Click here for our travertine gallery.

 Onyx
Onyx was originally used to describe only black and white banded Chalcedony (Quartz), with wide and flat bands of color. Today, however, stone cover under the term of Onyx has expanded to to include many types of semi-translucent to translucent banded varieties of many different stones. This includes other types of Quartz as well as Calcite, Marble and Travertine (often called Onyx Marble) and even some Alabasters. This stone is made of glassy lime carbonate and generally is seen in crystal layers in a variety of colors including green, yellow, gray, honey and white with yellow, brown and green shadows.

GRANITE COLORS TO CONSIDER
Click here to go to the Granite Slab Gallery

The following colors of granite slabs can be seen in the granite gallery. Amadeus granite, american red, african red, american black, angola black, angola gold, artic blue, aurora, blue eyes granite, blue bahia granite, azul macubas granite, japarana fantastico granite, aurora granite, labradorite green granite, galacticca blue granite, azul macuba granite, azul imperia granitel, bianco romano granite, bianco sardo granite, balmaral red granite, baltic brown granite, baltic imperial, blue california granite, blue star granite, blue renoir granite, bethel white granite, bianco sardo granite, bianco romano granite, black galaxy granite, blue eyes granite, blue pearl granite, blue bahia granite, blue caramel granite, dark mahogany granite, desert storm granite, gallio ornemental granite, gallio granite, veneziano granite, blue eyes granite, blue pearl granite, blue star granite, emeral pearl granite, gallio florence granite, gallio nepoleon granite, gallactica blue granite, galaxy black granite, galaxy silver granite, ghibi granite, canadian mahogany granite, emerald pearl granite, golden beach granite, golden leaf granite, golden persia granite, impala granite, juparana fantastico granite, juparana bordeaux granite, kashmir gold granite, kashmir white granite, labaradorite green granite, lapidus granite, louis blue granite, maduri gold granite, monet, granite ocean green granite, rainforest brown granite, rainforest green granite, roman gold granite, golden leaf granite, golden persia granite, ice green granite, ivory fantasy granite, jage green granite, juparana classico granite, juparana dark granite, juparana mahogany granite, juparana tobacco granite, juparana renoir granite, new ventian granite, renior blue granite, roman gold granite, sahara gold granite, saphire brown granite, louis blue granite, maduri gold, granite mahogany blueeyes granite, blue eyes granite, monet granite, new brown bahia granite, new ventian gold granite, renior blue granite, roman gold, sahara gold, santa rita, st cecilia, cecilia gold, stonewood, saphire brown, shivalkashi granite, silver cloud granite, silver sea green, granite spectolite brown granite, stecilia granite, stecilia gold granite, stone wood granite, stonewood granite, tan brown granite, tropic brown granite, twister green granite, volga blue granite, warehouse granite, wildwest green granite, verde jewel granite, verde lapponia granite, verde peacock granite, volga blue granite, verde san francisco granite, violetta granite, ubatuba gold granite,verde butterfly granite, verde gape granite, verde jaco, granite verde jewel granite, verde lapponia granite, golden ray granite, golden beach granite. Granite Gallery here

 

 

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